Plantar Fasciitis and heel pain

Do you have heel pain? You may be dealing with the most common heel condition present in adults, plantar fasciitis. What is plantar fasciitis? Plantar fasciitis is a degenerative change in the plantar fascia (a fine sheath of fibrous tissue connected to the inner portion of the heel). This usually causes pain in the heel most often upon weight bearing. Pain is typically worse in the morning or upon initiation of walking after a period of rest. This condition is present in approximately 10-15% of the population at some point in their lifetime (Landorf, 2015).

Most often this condition occurs in people between the ages of 40-60, but it can occur in those that are younger or older. Those at highest risk for plantar fasciitis are those that have a BMI over 30, partake in sports like dancing, running, and court type sports (basketball, tennis, etc…), are female, are pregnant, have hamstring or calf tightness, have decreased ankle mobility, and those with connective tissue disorders. Differential diagnoses for this condition include; calcaneal stress fracture, heel fat pad syndrome, longitudinal arch strain, achilles tendinopathy, calcaneal contusion, plantar calcaneal bursitis, tendonitits of posterior tibialis, plantar fascia tear, or in adolescents calcaneal apophysitis (Domino, Baldor, Golding, & Stephens, 2017). Plantat fasciitis is usually self-limiting and only lasts around 12 months, but why suffer for so long when you be diagnosed and treated much quicker. Diagnosis of plantar fasciitis can be made by a Physician with a thorough history taking, physical exam, and potentially use of diagnostic imaging, like X-ray or musculoskeletal ultrasound like that offered at Scottsdale Sports Medicine Institute. Treatment for this condition can vary anywhere from rolling the effected foot with a frozen water bottle and wearing supportive footwear to corticosteroid injections (UpToDate, 2018), so make sure you are getting the appropriate treatment and make your appointment to see Dr. Carfagno and his talented staff today. Do not deal with heel pain caused by plantar fasciitis any longer! #SSMI #byebyeheelpain #plantarfasciitis #carfagnocares

 

References

Domino, F. J., Baldor, R. A., Golding, J. & Stephens, M. B. (2017). The 5-minute clinical consult.(26thed). Philadelphia, PA: Wolters Kluwer. 

Landorf, K. B. (2015). Plantar heel pain and plantar fasciitis. BMJ clinical evidence, 2015.

UpToDate. (2018). Retrieved November 19, 2018, from https://www.uptodate.com/contents/plantar-fasciitis?search=plantar fasciitis&source=search_result&selectedTitle=1~40&usage_type=default&display_rank=1